What Is The Comparative And Superlative Of The Word Easy?

What is the comparative and superlative degree of the word easy?

Comparative. Take it easy. Superlative level. The simplest. An excellent form of the simplest.

What is the comparative and superlative degree of the simple?

The word “that” is often used after the comparative form.

Examples.

Comparison: basic, comparative and superlative adjectives
Basic Adjective Comparative Adjective Superlative Adjective
easy easier the easiest
happy happier the happiest
busy busier the busiest

What are comparative and superlative ratings?

We use comparatives and superlatives to express how people or things differ from each other. We use a comparative adjective to express how two people or things are different, and we use a superlative adjective to show how one person or thing is different from all others of its kind. For example, Mick is taller than Jack.

What are comparative and superlative ratings?

Comparative adjectives are used to compare one noun to another noun. In these cases, only two items are compared. For example, some might say that a thrush is meaner than a robin. Superlative adjectives are used to compare three or more nouns.

What is the wrong comparison?

Some adverbs have irregular comparative and superlative forms.

Examples.

Adverb Comparative Superlative
badly worse worst
far farther/further farthest/furthest
little less least
well better best

What is a good comparison?

These very common adjectives have completely irregular comparative and superlative forms.

Incorrect comparatives and superlatives.

Adjective Comparative Superlative
good better best
bad worse worst
little less least
much more most

What is a comparative example?

Comparative adjectives compare two people, places, or things. For example, in the sentence John is smarter but Bob is taller, the comparative forms of the adjectives smart (smarter) and tall (tall) are used to compare two people, John and Bob.

What are comparative words?

Comparative adjectives are used to compare the differences between the two objects they modify (more, less, faster, more). They are used in sentences that compare two nouns in the following scheme: noun (subject) + verb + comparative adjective + il + noun (object).

Leave a Comment